The Lost Art of Communication

Posted by on May 9, 2012 in Branding, Communication | 2 Comments

On a basic level, branding is still about connecting and building relationships, though these days it’s anything but basic. Instead we find ourselves using confusing terminology, complicated processes and ever changing technology. Somewhere along the way, in our rush to connect, we have neglected the fine art of communication and with it the skill needed to establish lasting relationships.

Whether we are referring to brands or to people, the same rules apply. Relationships thrive on good communication and whither on bad. In business there’s more effort involved with personal communication, but in a time-poor society lavishing that precious commodity on your clients will make your relationship more effective and longer lasting.

Now transfer the same thinking onto brands. Open up a meaningful dialogue with your customers and go to the effort of creating a personal branded experience and you come a long way to establishing that necessary emotional connection all brands need to succeed. Recent Nike campaigns have literally run with this concept. Check out the Nike She Runs the Night campaign for how to create a highly personal brand experience… on the night you only needed to look at the participant’s feet to see how effective this strategy was for Nike.

AMC Creative // Nike She Runs the Night

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2 Comments

  1. Chuck Kent
    May 10, 2012

    You’re right, branding is still about connecting and building relationships, but the effort needs to become ever more honestly relational. In the old push model it was about pushing out the brand promise in a mass media monologue. In the “new” (but rapidly aging) pull model, it’s become about pulling people in with content of value, whether the high-touch, high-value example you give in the Nike event or in the more ubiquitous web-based content creation/curation mode. As marketing channels, the Internet in particular, become more jammed with curated (and repetitive) content culled to satisfy search more than the searchers, branding will have to become more honestly about human communication and less about marketing manipulation. (Fairly easy to say; relatively expensive to do.)

    • AMC
      May 10, 2012

      Thanks Chuck, some good points there, especially the distinction between push/pull models. Audiences are cynical and rightly so, they’ve seen and heard most of it all before and usually been let down on the promise. You are correct, it is about honest, human communication, both on a brand and business level.